Ms. Crotchet calls time on tutti

Group vs. individual music lessons?

Kudos to colleagues who teach mixed groups of instruments, standards and ages as their norm. I know some who battle groups of 30 Bb/Eb clarinet and sax beginners. They’re braver than me!

So I’m blessed…

That last week, in a group of three, some Year 4 clarinet beginners managed a few opening notes of Pink Panther in their third lesson. I was as surprised as they were. With help from parents who play a little clarinet, they managed the first phrase next lesson. Are they practising? Heaps!

But I am OVER mismatched groups!

I sent an email to parents last year:Ruth + Student_6921

“Dear parents,

To best realise your child’s potential and optimise your investment, consider:

GROUP LESSONS – Pro and Con:

  • Group suits family budgets.
  • They nibble a teensy taste of music.
  • It’s sociable – if players are well matched and compatible.
  • BUT age, instruments and standards often vary.
  • Little scope for timetable changes, or adjustment.
  • 2 students in 30’ group = 15’ each.
  • 3 students in 30’ group = 10’ each. Pieces chosen for the group pace.
  • Time goes on aspects where Matt struggles but Jake plays easily.
  • Fingers twiddle while Mr. Quaver fixes a student’s bent key.
  • If a student misses a lesson that others attend, there’s no scope for make-up.
  • Exams aren’t feasible for groups with little time to cover all aspects. Ms. Crotchet talks staccato sfz, marcato, V between brows.
  • Presto to hear what students practised and give new pieces.
  • If no time to play all they prepared, why practice next week? They lose interest.

Practice dwindles > performance nervespractice

They need Ruth’s books (check the half-price deals and class sets).

Capable students stop lessons if frustrated, wasting talent and parents’ investment.

PRIVATE LESSONS

  • Negotiate timetable for premium times in break/before class.
  • Make-up lessons if 24 hours’ notice of illness or tests.
  • With teacher’s undivided attention, students move at their own, faster pace.
  • Ms. Dolce chooses pieces and styles they like, is enthusiastic, relaxed and fun.
  • Exams and competitions are well prepared, so high results are likely.
  • Students set and meet goals, enjoy challenges, realise potential and SHINE IN PERFORMANCE!”

CMP-with-shadow

Andante con momentum

It was a risk. But this year, Mrs Dolce’s schedule is full, her days long, but she emerges grazioso!

Win Music Books for Book Week

Sure, there’s Harry Potter. But what about books for music students? Surely there are some? Yes. And here’s a Book Week special; autographed copies of two of my books for young musicians – at a 2 for 1 deal.

Spring special - Motivate Practice and Empower performance

The books are:

• Practice is a Dirty Word: How to clean up your act

• Confident Music Performance: Fix the fear of facing an audience

The practice book:
• tackles head-on students’ excusesG# melodic
• highlights classic time wasters
• shows how to set goals and plan practice time
• how to program the brain for success
• fix mistakes and rhythmic glitches
• jazz up stale practice
• demystify and face scales

Order online in the next week and receive 2 books for the price of 1

Practice Cover

“Stimulating, thought provoking, and engagingly written by an experienced professional musician and teacher … highly recommended for music teachers, parents and music students.” – AccessEd

This book is non-threatening and easy to read. The author is aiming at students, but the psychology behind her wise words would be helpful to many parents and teachers as well. Ruth Bonetti has inspired me. I’m off to make music.
-Good Reading

More reviews at Good Reads and Amazon Where you can get my eBooks

  • Music Scales: Tips to Make Them Happen
  • Speak Out: Don’t Freak Out
  • Sounds and Souls: How music teachers change lives
Post reviews there and WIN 3 copies as thank you

Email me the link and your address, and receive 3 books:

  • One for you – because these books don’t return when lent!
  • One for your most motivated student as a reward and to lift them higher
  • One for that – um – student…

CMP-with-shadow

But your students are motivated, they perform with confidence, right?

If not… Here are solutions and doable tips.

This year I’ll…

Arg, New Year resolutions! Don’t go there. Under the influence of a glass or three, people make promised they can’t keep. But, bubbling with new impetus–and cold sober–shall l commit? OK. This year I will:

Run on time

Never mind that we’re on a roll with a student, making wonderful progress. If the next one is ready to rock, on time, say ‘See you next week.’ That’s a challenge.

Insist students buy music rather than photocopy

All need a main method or book so they can keep turning pages. Yes, add legit downloads, but resist photocopying. Try Smart Music. CD playalongs. Arrange more.

More practice

soundsandsoulsmedium

…Rather than just getting through the notes in orchestra rehearsals. This year I’ll be upfront again, as co-soloist in Mendelssohn’s Konzertstück with Sian Davis and Noosa Orchestra, on 13 and 20 September. And Brisbane Symphony Orchestra will program Bruckner, Mahler, Beethoven.

More play; Down Time Uplifts

My ‘Me Time’ keeps me sane. I nearly relented and gave it to a student that couldn’t fit elsewhere. But no, my weekly walk on the beach is precious. More swims, also.

What replenishes you that you won’t give up? Mark it in your diary. In 2B pencil.

In The Artist’s Way Julia Cameron recommends a weekly ‘artist’s date’ and I can vouch for it. And for other rejuvenation strategies that I’ll share on 28 February at the Music Teachers Association of Tasmania conference. My topics:

• How to Motivate, Retain and Inspire Students
• Techniques to Rejuvenate and Overcome Workplace Challenges
• Empower Students to Shine in Performance

Nowhere near Hobart? The rejuvenation tips are covered in my book and eBook

 Sounds and Souls: How music teachers change lives.

‘Ruth Bonetti has written a book that not only demonstrates the value of music tuition but offers invaluable advice on how to run a private studio. No matter how long you have been teaching, you will find something in this book that will enhance your experience. Thank you, Ruth, I will always treasure your sage advice.’

-Karen Kelly, Gundagai, NSW

More head stretch; 

I’ll learn Finnish (Scary with all those umlauts!)

More travel

An Adelaide trip is likely this semester, so email me if you’d like to take the opportunity for workshops at minimal travel costs. Or for sessions elsewhere. My diary is open; now that I have finished my next book, I’m more available to present.

More teaching

… I can fit in a few more students. Perhaps a day in a school. Interested, anyone?

Phew! I need a glass to toast to all my resolves.

Tips for confident music performance

Do you dread that next concert, audition or music exam?

There’s a good chance we will even ENJOY performance if we prepared intelligently and regularly in the months before. We may even manage to shrug off those butterflies and nervous greeblies. The secret is to program our brains for success.

Program your music computer

Think of your practice as computer programming. We feed in correct information about hand positions, the sequence and length of notes. Then, if a wave of panic washes over us early in a performance, it need not dump us. We can surf on automatic for a few moments, knowing that our brain will send messages to our fingers or lips without our consciously driving them. How’s that for a confidence trick! (From Practice is a Dirty Word)

Record and listen back

What passages, bars, sections need most attention? With a photocopy of the part (you do own it, yes?) highlight any mistakes and fumbles. Count the number of highlight splats – and apply most of your practice to these bars. A week later record again and listen back with a fresh photocopy. Have your splats reduced?

Go for goals

Set yourself achievable, reasonable, short-term aims each day. Within each time slot, allow yourself several minutes’ relaxation, movement, a breath of fresh air, and a drink of water. Oxygen and water are powerful brain foods. You will then use work-time more efficiently and minimise risk of repetitive strain injury.

Give yourself the satisfaction of crossing goals off the list when they are reached. Reward yourself with a pat on the back or a treat.

Practise what you can’t play…

…Instead of what you can! There’s no time to waste in reassuring yourself by playing the easy bits that lie under your fingers. Tackle the cross-rhythms or that development section that bristles with double sharps in obscure keys.

Make every minute of your practice time count.

Keep at it! You can achieve wonders with focus and determination.