Walk the Talk

How do you prepare a speech? Consider the difference if you write for the ear or the eye; each requires a different mind set and approach. Both need active verbs and vital language to hold attention.

With presentations you engage the audience. Speak naturally.

To prepare a presentation

This works for me to create a natural rather than stilted style:

  • Brainstorm what points I will cover.
  • Walk with my notes as I speak it through (I’m blessed with paths amongst trees and by beaches).
  • Tape on my iPad notes function.
  • Email this as text to my computer, to be edited and polished.
  • With the printout I walk and speak it through to the birds. I discover clunky phrases and words that invite stumbles. As my tongue finds a vivid sentence I talk it into my iPad.
  • I time it on my iPhone as my walking pace matches thoughts and words.
  • Before a big speech I walk the talk to memorise crucial opening and closing senences. (Automaton saved me when an MC skipped my submitted biog and introduced me as ‘Ruth Cracknell.’ Gulp. Que?@#!? But on with the speech.)

Activate both brain hemispheres

Walking is a cross-crawl action, that allows us to unlock brain power and encourages a mix of logical and creative thinking.

‘When we walk, the two halves of our brains converse.’ Julia Cameron Walking in This World.

Follow the paths of pilgrims and philosophers

For philosophers like Kant, Rousseau and Nietzsche walking was daily discipline. Gandhi and Mandela walked with the masses for freedom. Jesus Christ walked as He taught his disciples. For indigenous Aborigines and American Indians their bare foot ‘walkabouts’ made contact with the land.

Walk to focus and problem solve.speakoutmedium

‘It is solved by walking.’ – St Augustine

‘All truly great ideas are conceived while walking’ – Nietzsche

Begin with the Brainstorm

Last week as I coached someone for his presentation skills, I noticed yet again the necessity to help him write his speech before we could solve performance aspects.

We began in relaxed conversation to understand issues he planned to address.

We wrote bullet points on a white board.

As he passed through that initial stumbling exploratory stage and began to fire with enthusiasm, thoughts flowed naturally. At that point I taped him on my iPad, and emailed the file. The content was fresh with flow, focus and passion. He could then edit and polish.

Big speech coming up? 

Email for speechwriting and coaching in presentation skills, training.

But it’s tomorrow!

Download my 90-minute read Speak Out: Don’t Freak Out

Your speaking can flow with ease so your experience, expertise and natural enthusiasm shine through.

 

This year I’ll…

Arg, New Year resolutions! Don’t go there. Under the influence of a glass or three, people make promised they can’t keep. But, bubbling with new impetus–and cold sober–shall l commit? OK. This year I will:

Run on time

Never mind that we’re on a roll with a student, making wonderful progress. If the next one is ready to rock, on time, say ‘See you next week.’ That’s a challenge.

Insist students buy music rather than photocopy

All need a main method or book so they can keep turning pages. Yes, add legit downloads, but resist photocopying. Try Smart Music. CD playalongs. Arrange more.

More practice

soundsandsoulsmedium

…Rather than just getting through the notes in orchestra rehearsals. This year I’ll be upfront again, as co-soloist in Mendelssohn’s Konzertstück with Sian Davis and Noosa Orchestra, on 13 and 20 September. And Brisbane Symphony Orchestra will program Bruckner, Mahler, Beethoven.

More play; Down Time Uplifts

My ‘Me Time’ keeps me sane. I nearly relented and gave it to a student that couldn’t fit elsewhere. But no, my weekly walk on the beach is precious. More swims, also.

What replenishes you that you won’t give up? Mark it in your diary. In 2B pencil.

In The Artist’s Way Julia Cameron recommends a weekly ‘artist’s date’ and I can vouch for it. And for other rejuvenation strategies that I’ll share on 28 February at the Music Teachers Association of Tasmania conference. My topics:

• How to Motivate, Retain and Inspire Students
• Techniques to Rejuvenate and Overcome Workplace Challenges
• Empower Students to Shine in Performance

Nowhere near Hobart? The rejuvenation tips are covered in my book and eBook

 Sounds and Souls: How music teachers change lives.

‘Ruth Bonetti has written a book that not only demonstrates the value of music tuition but offers invaluable advice on how to run a private studio. No matter how long you have been teaching, you will find something in this book that will enhance your experience. Thank you, Ruth, I will always treasure your sage advice.’

-Karen Kelly, Gundagai, NSW

More head stretch; 

I’ll learn Finnish (Scary with all those umlauts!)

More travel

An Adelaide trip is likely this semester, so email me if you’d like to take the opportunity for workshops at minimal travel costs. Or for sessions elsewhere. My diary is open; now that I have finished my next book, I’m more available to present.

More teaching

… I can fit in a few more students. Perhaps a day in a school. Interested, anyone?

Phew! I need a glass to toast to all my resolves.

How adrenalin lifts performance

Adrenalin helps us to shine in performance. Be prepared and welcome it, for it gives energy and strength to performances. The power of this natural, normal and helpful reaction can catch us unawares. Go with it; don’t fight it. As the fight or flight mechanism kicks in our adrenals work overtime.

Beware adrenal fatigue!

You know the score? Late nights preparing for that big performance, the rehearsals, checking equipment and dress (we’ve thought ahead, right?), the photocopying of adjudicators’ scores. Or sometimes we perform every night, with little time to catch up on our thoughts, sleep and energy. We stoke up our adrenalin constantly so must avoid adrenal fatigue.

Adrenalin has two sides

That big day or night goes well. Relief (but you did deserve it – you practised hard, didn’t you?) Audience congratulations. Thank you, glad you enjoyed it.

We need down-time 

Wind down. In spite of exhaustion, there’s that wriggly feeling of being overcharged. Mind buzzing. Restless, aching legs.  Many feel pain or tension in their lower backs, a major adrenal pressure point. I feel the fatigue in sore calves.

And finally, to bed. But not to sleep. But I toss and wriggle for ten minutes or more.

Or up-time

Think; I really should get out of bed and do some yoga. A few minutes’ shoulder stands, some stretching exercises would fix this. A cobra or two. Nah, too tired to get up. Maybe if I just lift my legs in bed, that’ll do. Maybe not.

So then I crawl out from the blankets, stretch, ‘lift the mountain’ with my arms. Touch my toes. Elevate my legs. Muscles creak gratefully. A good relaxant is the ‘tranquility pose.’ (Check the poses online.)

And so to sleep…

At last. All that hard work means it’s the deep sleep of the just.

Next day, I’m renewed. On with the next show.
Play beautifully!

More tips in Confident Music Performance 

‘Tis the season for concerts

End of year concerts may be wearing but they are teachers’ top chance to bring parents onside. They love to see their offspring shine onstage, and are at the ready with iPads and smart phones to record for posterity and possibly upload to YouTube. 

Ah, there’s the crunch

Be aware, make others aware, that copyright and privacy may be infringed.

Is it ‘fair use’ to distribute material, performances of works that are copyright?

When playing for weddings, I accept that it’s the happy couple’s day so will be filmed to the nth degree. Thus, I must practise beforehand and resist the temptation to sightread new material during the Canapés, for glitches can feature.

But let’s make a noise…

That performers can be inhibited and distracted when listeners stand in a concert holding a camera of any kind. Professional musicians have fought back. Polish pianist Krystian Zimerman halted a concert in Essen, Germany. He asked an audience member to stop filming him on a smartphone. After the interval he said ‘Apologies, I am now on YouTube’ and refused to play encores or attend the post-concert function.

But everyone does it, right?

It’s illegal and an infringement of privacy to film and post images, video and sound that include other peoples’ children without permission. It infringes composers’ copyright.

Concert manners

We want all the family to attend concerts, to feel at home. But this does not mean to roam at large, chattering and giggling so others can’t enjoy the music. Educate the students – and parents – in basic etiquette:

  • Ears open, mouth closed. At least, a subtle sotto voce.
  • If you must move, wait between pieces or movements.
  • Tip toe…

The upside of technology

A generation ago, young children were primed with a book to combat boredom. Then they moved to digital games, iPod music and movies. The downside is noise. Earplugs, please.

Presents – for you

Buy a copy of my new book Sounds and Souls: How music teachers change lives for your school library and receive an extra copy as my gift to you. This offer lasts until Christmas Day. (Or you can download it on Kindle but I’ve yet to work out how to do specials there.)

Enjoy your break, happy Christmas and God bless,

10 tips to perform words or music

speakoutmediumThe moments before a performance are your launch pad. Then, you can make a crucial difference between maintaining calm control or succumbing to blind panic. You need to learn to slow down on your launch pad, to resist the impulse to rush on and tumble headlong into an incoherent performance.

Assemble your own check-list from these suggestions:

1. Sit comfortably, visualise transferring all your nervous energy away from the tense part of your body (e.g. the jaw or fingers) down into your toes. 

2. Think “toes, toes, toes” and your jaw/fingers relax. Give your hands about twenty vigorous shakes.

3. Sip some water or rinse your mouth. 

4. Think “I feel fine, my fingers and shoulders are relaxed, I am in good form. The audience will like me.”

5. Turn down the volume of those nagging voices in your head. Instead, focus on the outcome you desire – to inspire, to entertain, to win.

6. Warm your hands and fingers by relaxed movements, stretching or other gentle exercise. Limber up as athletes do, starting with easy, relaxed actions, then
increase the challenge as your muscles loosen up. Water and heat are excellent therapies.
Cold contracts muscles, causing tension. Remember how reluctantly limbs move when we play in draughty halls in winter?

When performing in northern Sweden, often above the Arctic Circle, I learned to thaw my cold fingers under the dressing-room hot taps, the warmth relaxing my muscles. Alternatively, bring gloves or a hot-water bottle.

7. Turn those fidgets to good use! Waiting backstage, many feel the urge to fidget. Perhaps we should adopt the Mediterranean habit of fiddling with worry beads – a more healthy distraction than a cigarette.

8. Stretch. Stand against a wall to ensure upright posture.

9. Imagine “I am the greatest”. Assume a confident, positive face. Smile.

10. Breathe. Slow down.

                         You’re on. Be the greatest you can. Have fun!

Excerpt from Speak Out – Don’t Freak Out by Ruth Bonetti Available on Kindle